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Wednesday, 06 December 2017 00:00

Avoid Foot Pain and Keep Feet Feeling Great

We all spend so much time on our feet during the holiday season, walking the malls, standing and mingling at cocktail parties, and more. It can make anyone’s feet hurt! What can you do to keep your feet feeling great now and into the New Year? Here are some suggestions from Boris Abramov, DPM and Tatyana Abramova, DPM:

1. Take a few minutes in the morning to help your feet wake up. Roll your ankle in each direction. Spread your toes and squeeze them together. With your leg straight, flex your ankle and pull your toes toward your face, then extend your ankle and point your toes.

2. Wear shoes that fit. When was the last time you had your feet professionally measured? Head to the shoe store for a fitting and invest in a new pair of shoes. Choose a pair made of breathable fabric with a wide, roomy toe box and a low, chunky heel. Non-stick rubber soles will add stability and reduce the risk of falls.

3.  Accept assistance. If walking is physically challenging for you, lean on a friend or loved one. Use a cane if it helps. Consider a walker. Contemporary models are more sleek, lightweight, and easy to use than those you may remember from years ago.

4. Take a break. If walking is physically challenging, or your feet feel uncomfortable, have a seat for a few minutes. Elevate your feet if you can.

5. Put those high heels on a high shelf. High-heeled shoes with narrow toe boxes force the feet into unnatural positions. Long-term use can lead to ingrown toenails, hammertoes, and bunions. Save your stilettos for special occasions or, even better, retire them completely.

6. Maintain a healthy weight. Excess pounds put stress on the back, hips, lower legs, ankles, and feet. Obesity is a contributing factor in fallen arches and heel pain. Eat in moderation, even at your next cookie swap or holiday buffet.

7.  Stay hydrated. A healthy fluid intake is essential to preventing foot cramping. Aim for a minimum of 64 ounces per day.

Of course, the best thing you can do to ensure that your feet stay comfortable is to visit the podiatrist regularly. Call Abramov’s Comprehensive Foot Care at 443-872-7052 or click here to schedule an appointment with Dr. Boris Abramov and Dr. Tatyana Abramova in our comfortable and convenient Pikesville office. Your feet and ankles will benefit from a thorough examination, careful diagnosis of any existing or potential issues, individualized treatment, and ongoing follow up care.

Friday, 01 December 2017 00:00

Holiday Gift Ideas for Feet You Love

 

The holiday season is here and many people are making lists and checking them twice, then heading out shopping to buy gifts for friends and loved ones. Give the gift of healthy, comfortable and beautiful feet this year! Check out this list of recommendations from Boris Abramov, DPM and Tatyana Abramova, DPM. Many options can even be ordered online from home, saving you a trip to that crowded mall.

Improve Balance with Yoga

Is someone you know dealing with diminished balance? Falls can be a real concern. Gentle yoga can help. Research local studios and assemble a basket with a gift certificate for classes, new yoga mat, and a pair of specialty socks with rubber grips on the bottoms.

Spa Pedicure

If you’ll be giving a salon gift certificate to someone on your list this year, be sure to purchase a set of pedicure tools (toenail clipper, cuticle nipper, emery board and more) to accompany it. A spa pedicure is a lovely mid-winter indulgence but the possibility of contracting plantar warts, athlete’s foot and fungal nail infections due to less-than-perfect sanitary practices is real. Bringing tools from home reduces this risk.

New Shoehorn

It can be hard for many people, especially the elderly and the very overweight, to reach their feet and to put on their shoes. A shoe horn is a practical gift that can help. Choose a long one that reduces the need to bend and put a big red bow on it.

Socks, Socks, Socks

Everyone loves new socks! Choose a fuzzy pair with aloe-infused fibers to keep feet soft, or a wool pair that will keep feet warm during outside activities. Did you know that new socks are the number one request from people living on the streets? Consider giving socks from a company that donates a pair for every one purchased, or one that even a donation to a charity that provides socks to homeless citizens.

Think of the feet as the canaries in the coal mines of our bodies. Foot health is a reflection of overall wellbeing, and a harbinger of things to come. If it’s been a while since someone on your list has been seen by a podiatrist, call 443-872-7052 or click here to schedule an appointment to be seen in Abramov’s Comprehensive Foot Care’s comfortable and convenient Pikesville office. Dr. Boris Abramov and Dr. Tatyana Abramova will provide your loved one with a compete examination, expert diagnosis of any existing or potential issues, an individualized treatment plan, and thorough aftercare.

Hyperhidrosis is the word that medical professionals use to refer to unusual and excessive sweating not triggered by exercise or nervousness. Anyone can be affected. According to the International Hyperhidrosis Society, 3 percent of Americans live with the condition. Their sweat glands activate sooner and remain active for longer periods of time than they do in people without the condition.

Hyperhidrosis can appear anywhere on the body, but it’s typically observed in the armpits, the face and head, or the palms of the hands. Plantar hyperhidrosis is excessive sweating on the feet. Routinely damp feet can create other challenging podiatric situations, including nail fungus, athlete’s foot, and foot odor.

Causes of Plantar Hyperhidrosis

Many factors can trigger an episode of plantar hyperhidrosis, including anxiety, warm temperatures, illness or fever, and wearing socks or shoes made of non-breathable fabrics.

Who is at risk of hyperhidrosis? Three main factors come into play: age, gender, and family history. Hyperhidrosis is more common in younger individuals than older people, and more men than women suffer from it. Further, if your parent or sibling has hyperhidrosis, your odds of a diagnosis are increased.

Preventing Episodes of Plantar Hyperhidrosis

If you notice that your feet tend to get unusually sweaty, begin keeping a record of how and when sweating episodes occur. This will help you and your foot doctor identify triggers that can be avoided.  What else can you do to keep your sweaty feet dry and odor-free? Here are some helpful tips from Boris Abramov, DPM and Tatyana Abramova, DPM:

 

$11.     Occasional foot soaks may control odor. When added to soaking water, black tea, baking soda, vinegar, or fresh sage have all been shown to mitigate sweating and odor.

$12.     Eat carefully. Some patients report that hyperhidrosis episodes are triggered by spicy foods.

$13.     Reduce your stress levels where you can. This will improve all areas of health and wellbeing, and can reduce the intensity of your hyperhidrosis.

Remember to practice good hygiene. Wash and dry feet twice daily. Use foot powder or corn starch to absorb sweat. Spray your feet with antiperspirant. Wear clean socks every day; change them mid-day if you need to. 

Medical Treatment for Plantar Hyperhidrosis

The most dramatic treatment option for heavy sweating is injections of botulinum toxin A (Botox). It works by preventing the release of a chemical that signals the sweat glands to activate. Iontophoresis is a procedure in which a medical device is used to pass a mild electrical current through water (usually using shallow pans for feet) and through the skin's surface. It’s painless and there are no significant or serious side effects.  For patients who have not been helped by treatments like Botox and iontophoresis, prescription oral medications are available.

Is excessive sweating having a negative impact on your life? You’re not alone. Dr. Boris Abramov and Dr. Tatyana Abramova have been helping patients just like you for many years and they can help you, too. Call Abramov’s Comprehensive Foot Care at 443-872-7052 or click here today to schedule a convenient appointment in our comfortable Pikesville office.

Wednesday, 22 November 2017 00:00

It’s Time to Give Up Your High Heels

Originally designed for use during horseback riding, high heeled shoes have been fashion-forward footwear for more than 400 years. Today, 72% of women wear high heels. 31% wear them to work daily and 50-77% choose them for parties and special occasions.

Those stilettos may be nice to look at, but wearing them often causes a host of issues for the body, especially in the feet, ankles, and lower legs. Every time you wear high heeled shoes, you put your body out of alignment. It’s not so terrible if it only happens once in a while, but the long-term result of constant misalignment can be pain not only in your feet, but in your shoulders, neck and back as well. Further, the intense and ongoing reshaping of the feet can lead to a variety of deformities.

$1·      High heels decrease the “base of support,” the amount of the sole of the foot that is in contact with the ground. This diminishes balance and places you at an increased risk for falls, ankle sprains and fractures.

$1·      High heels cause increased stress along the sole of the foot and can contribute to plantar fasciitis.

$1·      Style usually dictates that high heeled shoes have narrow toe boxes, which squeeze and push the toes together. This can lead to hammertoes and neuromas.

$1·      Long-time high heel aficionados often suffer from bunions, bony bumps that form at the base of the big toe. This hard knob sticks out of the side of your foot, causing pain and making it hard to wear any shoes comfortably.

$1·      Bone damage can occur after protracted wearing of high heels. Walking over a long distance or for an extended period of time in heels can cause stress fractures or cracks in the bones of the feet.

Switching to sensible, comfortable shoes with a roomy toe box and low, wide heels is the most sensible choice for everyday use. If you’re not yet ready to give up your heels:

$1·      Choose shoes with heels that are 3 inches or less. Anything higher will change the biomechanics of how you walk, compounding the stress you put on your back and hips.

$1·      Choose a newer, modern-looking pair of shoes with a chunky heel over a pair with a spiked heel. This will help distribute your weight more effectively.

$1·      Look for a pair of shoes with softer soles or built-in cushioning to reduce impact and stress on your muscles and joints.

$1·      Mix it up! Wear different shoes each day to change the stress points on your feet.

Are you experiencing discomfort or any other problem in your feet, ankles, or lower legs? Call us at 443-872-7052 or click here today to schedule an appointment with in our comfortable and convenient Pikesville office. At Abramov’s Comprehensive Foot Care, you can rest assured that podiatrists Dr. Boris Abramov and Dr. Tatyana Abramova will provide you with a thorough examination, accurate diagnosis, state of the art treatment and comprehensive follow up. 

Friday, 10 November 2017 00:00

Dealing with Foot Odor

Smelly feet and shoes can be not only annoying but embarrassing as well. Bromodosis, or smelly feet, is a very common medical condition. According to the American Podiatric Medical Association, there is one simple cause of unpleasant foot odor: perspiration. Of the 2 to 4 million sweat glands located on your body, more than 250,000 are located in your feet. When sweat accumulates on the feet and in the socks and shoes, it leads to bacteria growth on the skin. Those bacteria feed off dead skin cells and cause foot odor.

Causes of Bromodosis

$1·      Hyperhidrosis, atypical and excessive perspiration on the feet, particularly on the soles and in between the toes

$1·      Fungal infections including athlete’s foot

$1·      Stress

$1·      Certain medications

$1·      Alcohol and/or drug abuse

$1·      Changes in hormone levels

$1·      Poor hygiene

Living with Bromodosis

The good news is that bromodosis is relatively easy to treat on your own and, if you need help, it can be found at your podiatrist’s office. Here are several suggestions that should help, all revolving around your socks. If these suggestions don't work, it’s time to call Abramov’s Comprehensive Foot Carefor an appointment with Boris Abramov, DPM and Tatyana Abramova, DPM.

Select Your Socks Carefully

Choosing the right socks to wear can help reduce foot sweat—and in turn, unpleasant odor. To help your feet breathe when wearing socks, go for materials like cotton or wool that naturally allow more air to get through, keeping your feet cooler. Avoid synthetic materials like polyester, which cause excess sweat to become trapped and encourage the growth of bacteria.

With a bit of determination, you can find active or sportswear socks that are not only made of good materials for your purposes, but also contain panels to help ventilate sweaty feet.

Change Socks Twice a Day

Always start your day with a clean pair of socks and keep a change or two with you at all times, whether you’re at work, running errands, or out for a night on the town. By changing your socks a twice a day – or even more often if you need to – you can prevent bromodosis-causing bacteria from growing on your feet, catching the odor before it really becomes noticeable, and reducing any unpleasant foot odor.

Wear Socks When You Wear Shoes

Forgoing socks when you’re wearing sandals is fine. Your feet are exposed to the air and sweat has an opportunity to dry. However, it’s not a great idea to wear closed shoes like sneakers, dress shoes, and boots without socks if you’re prone to bromodosis. Appropriate socks made of breathable materials actually wick sweat away from your feet and reduce your risk of odor. When you skip socks, the sweat has nowhere to go and bacteria multiply, leading to that foot odor you’re trying to avoid.

Are you embarrassed by foot odor? Do you feel like your problem is chronic or severe? Are you unable to manage your bromodosis without help? The best option is to see your podiatrist. Call Abramov’s Comprehensive Foot Care at 443-872-7052 or click here to schedule an appointment with Boris Abramov, DPM and Tatyana Abramova, DPM in our comfortable and convenient Pikesville office. They’ll be happy to examine your feet, determine the source of your issue, and work with you to create an individualized plan for treatment and follow up.

For centuries myths, rumors, and fallacies were part of “medicine,” and no part of our bodies was subject to more of those inaccuracies than the feet. Happily, just as we learned that the Earth is round and orbits the sun, we also now know more than we ever have about the feet – their anatomy, the injuries and illnesses which affect them, and the best courses of treatment for those problems - than we ever have. Is your knowledge up to date?

MYTH: Cutting a v-shaped notch in an ingrown toenail will help it heal.

FACT: Don’t cut a notch in aningrown toenail. Contrary to popular belief, it will not prevent your toenail from curling inward. Remember to trim toenails straight across. Don’t round the corners like you would on your fingers.

MYTH: Plantar fasciitis is caused by a bone spur.

FACT:Plantar fasciitis is a soft tissue condition. The plantar fascia is a ligament that connects your heel to your toes and supports the arch of your foot. Small tears and inflammation can cause discomfort in the heel over an extended period of time, and it’s especially bad when you first wake up. Your podiatrist can help by suggesting stretches and other at-home treatments, prescribing medication, or providing you with a pair of custom-made orthotics to insert in your shoes for additional cushioning and support.

MYTH: Corns have roots.

FACT: Like calluses, corns are a build-up of skin caused by pressure or friction. They don’t have roots, so don’t try to cut them off, file them down, or dig out their non-existent roots. This can cause pain, infection, and lead to further problems. Your corn should be treated by a podiatrist.

MYTH: Soaking my feet in vinegar is will cure toenail fungus.

FACT: This is just an old wives’ tale. Vinegar won’t do anything, and may even make the situation worse. See your podiatrist for propertreatment.

MYTH: Only jocks can get athlete’s foot.

FACT: Athlete’s foot is a highly contagious fungal infection.  It got its name because the fungus that causes it thrives in warm, humid places like locker rooms, pool decks, and public showers, where you’re likely to find athletes. But everyone is vulnerable – young and old, men, women, and children.

Are you living with pain or another issue related to your feet, ankles, or lower legs? Boris Abramov, DPM and Tatyana Abramova, DPM can help. Call Abramov’s Comprehensive Foot Care at 443-872-7052 or click here today to schedule an appointment in our comfortable and convenient Pikesville office. Every week, Dr. Boris Abramov and Dr. Tatyana Abramova provide care for men, women, and children of all ages. They will thoroughly examine your feet, carefully diagnose your problem, work with you to create an effective and individualized treatment plan, and provide comprehensive follow up. 

Friday, 27 October 2017 00:00

Obesity and Your Feet

Maintaining a healthy weight is an essential part of foot health.  Currently, up to one third of Americans have a body mass index greater than 30, making them clinically obese. Obesity is a risk for numerous chronic health conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart disease. Those excess pounds also increase pressure in your hips, knees and ankles and create potential problems for your feet. Over time, obesity stresses your legs and wears down your feet. Connective tissues stretch out, natural fat pads on the bottom of your feet become compressed, and muscles are taxed.  Numerous studies have found a direct link between increased BMI and painful foot conditions including arthritis, tendonitis and heel pain.

Proper Foot Care

Patients who are very overweight sometimes find it hard to reach their feet to trim their toenails. Unfortunately, improper or haphazard trimming can result in ingrown toenails. Further, very obese patients can find it challenging to maintain proper podiatric hygiene. This makes them vulnerable to athlete’s foot and fungal toenail infections.

Plantar Fasciitis

The pressure and stress that extra body weight puts on muscles, joints, and tendons in the feet can also trigger plantar fasciitis, a painful inflammation of the tissue along the bottom of the foot. Heel pain, especially in the morning, is the most common symptom of plantar fasciitis.

Fallen Arches and Pronation

Obesity places a greater amount of tress on our feet when we stand or walk than they are built to handle. Over time, this physically alters them. Further, excess weight wears down even the best shoes and they quickly become less supportive than expected. Fallen arches can occur.

Obesity will often result in over-pronation, a condition in which people stand or walk not with their feet flat on the ground, but rolling slightly to the outside. This pushes the heels closer together and the ankles farther apart and can also cause chronic pain.

Mitigating the Effects of Excess Weight on Your Feet

Even relatively light physical activities can be uncomfortable to people who are obese. This makes overweight people exercise less. It becomes cyclical. The lack of adequate exercise makes you gain even more weight, which increases the pain and keeps you from moving.  Start with low-impact activities, such as walking, water aerobics, or gentle yoga.

Shoes that properly support the foot – especially the arch and ankle – and allow for good circulation are particularly important for overweight patients. Proper, professionally-fitted footwear can absorb shock, support the arches, and keep the feet properly aligned. Sensible shoes made of breathable fabric and with a wide, low heel and a comfortable toe box can help you stand and walk without pain, especially when used in combination with custom orthotics prescribed by your podiatrist.

Is excess weight making it uncomfortable for you to stand, walk, or move? Dr. Boris Abramov and Dr. Tatyana Abramova can help. Call Abramov’s Comprehensive Foot Care at 443-872-7052 today or click here to schedule an appointment today in our Pikesville, MD office. Boris Abramov, DPM and Tatyana Abramova, DPM will thoroughly examine your feet and expertly diagnose any problems, then provide appropriate treatment and comprehensive after care.

Thursday, 19 October 2017 00:00

Common Childhood Foot Problems

Children and adolescents are more than just “little adults.” When it comes to their health care, we take them to pediatricians and family care practitioners -- physicians who are specially trained to meet their unique needs. Similarly, they experience foot and ankle issues of their own, and are best served by podiatrists like Dr. Boris Abramov and Dr. Tatyana Abramova, who bring years of specialized training and experience to diagnosing and treating young people.

Warts and Fungal Infections

Kids spend even more time in places where people are barefoot, such as locker rooms and public pools, than adults do. This puts them at high risk of plantar warts and fungal nail infections. Encourage your child to keep a pair of inexpensive shower shoes in his or her bag, and to wear them at all times. Remind your child never to share socks or shoes, even with friends or family members.

If you notice symptoms of a wart or a nail infection, call your foot doctor right away. Both situations are easier to resolve when caught in their early stages.

Ingrown Toenails

Anyone with an ingrown toenail, whether an adult or a child, is likely to experience uncomfortable swelling and tenderness. There may even be pus present if the problem continues. The most common causes of ingrown toenails are poorly fitting shoes and improper trimming. Be sure to take your child for a proper fitting each time he or she needs new footwear. It’s likely that he has grown since you bought the last pair. Until your child is old enough to handle the job reliably, trim his or her toenails yourself. Always use a clipper rather than scissors, and trim straight across without rounding the corners.

If you’re concerned that your child has an ingrown toenail, don’t try to address the problem yourself. It’s time to see the podiatrist.

Foot and Ankle Injuries

Foot and ankle injuries are common in children due to their high levels of physical activity. Schedule an appointment with your podiatrist immediately if you notice a decrease in your child’s interest in sports or other physical activities or if you observe:

$1·      ankles turning in more than usual

$1·      foot arch flattening

$1·      cramping

$1·      pain

$1·      limping

Gait Abnormalities

Until a child is approximately 3 years old, their normal way of walking is different from an adult’s. Initially, there is a wide-based stance with rapid, short steps. Eventually your child should develop a more mature way of walking. The most common types of gait abnormalities in young children are turning the toes in, turning the toes out, walking on the toes, and limping. If you are still seeing any of these by the time your child is ready for preschool, a consultation with your podiatrist is in order.

If you have a concern about the health of your child’s feet or ankles, Boris Abramov, DPM and Tatyana Abramova, DPM can help. Every week, they examine and treat kids, making sure that they are comfortable and at ease through the process. Call Abramov’s Comprehensive Foot Care at 443-872-7052 or click here today to schedule an appointment in our conveniently located Pikesville office. 

Thursday, 19 October 2017 00:00

Common Childhood Foot Problems

Children and adolescents are more than just “little adults.” When it comes to their health care, we take them to pediatricians and family care practitioners -- physicians who are specially trained to meet their unique needs. Similarly, they experience foot and ankle issues of their own, and are best served by podiatrists like Dr. Boris Abramov and Dr. Tatyana Abramova, who bring years of specialized training and experience to diagnosing and treating young people.

Warts and Fungal Infections

Kids spend even more time in places where people are barefoot, such as locker rooms and public pools, than adults do. This puts them at high risk of plantar warts and fungal nail infections. Encourage your child to keep a pair of inexpensive shower shoes in his or her bag, and to wear them at all times. Remind your child never to share socks or shoes, even with friends or family members.

If you notice symptoms of a wart or a nail infection, call your foot doctor right away. Both situations are easier to resolve when caught in their early stages.

Ingrown Toenails

Anyone with an ingrown toenail, whether an adult or a child, is likely to experience uncomfortable swelling and tenderness. There may even be pus present if the problem continues. The most common causes of ingrown toenails are poorly fitting shoes and improper trimming. Be sure to take your child for a proper fitting each time he or she needs new footwear. It’s likely that he has grown since you bought the last pair. Until your child is old enough to handle the job reliably, trim his or her toenails yourself. Always use a clipper rather than scissors, and trim straight across without rounding the corners.

If you’re concerned that your child has an ingrown toenail, don’t try to address the problem yourself. It’s time to see the podiatrist.

Foot and Ankle Injuries

Foot and ankle injuries are common in children due to their high levels of physical activity. Schedule an appointment with your podiatrist immediately if you notice a decrease in your child’s interest in sports or other physical activities or if you observe:

$1·      ankles turning in more than usual

$1·      foot arch flattening

$1·      cramping

$1·      pain

$1·      limping

Gait Abnormalities

Until a child is approximately 3 years old, their normal way of walking is different from an adult’s. Initially, there is a wide-based stance with rapid, short steps. Eventually your child should develop a more mature way of walking. The most common types of gait abnormalities in young children are turning the toes in, turning the toes out, walking on the toes, and limping. If you are still seeing any of these by the time your child is ready for preschool, a consultation with your podiatrist is in order.

If you have a concern about the health of your child’s feet or ankles, Boris Abramov, DPM and Tatyana Abramova, DPM can help. Every week, they examine and treat kids, making sure that they are comfortable and at ease through the process. Call Abramov’s Comprehensive Foot Care at 443-872-7052 or click here today to schedule an appointment in our conveniently located Pikesville office. 

It’s autumn. Temperatures are cooling, leaves are changing colors, and many people are outside, taking in the beauty of the landscape by hiking and camping. These active pastimes are healthy and good for your whole body, but can be rough on your feet and even lead to ankle sprains. Here are some tips from podiatrists Boris Abramov, DPM and Tatyana Abramova, DPM to make sure that your feet and ankles stay safe and comfortable while you’re outside.

Prepping –Trim Toenails and Practice Good Hygiene

Too-long toenails can make hiking uncomfortable and can become ingrown after hours on the trail. Prep for your hike by trimming your toenails. Remember to use a clipper, rather than scissors. Trim straight across; never round the corners, which can cause them to grow into the skin.  Make sure your feet are clean and dry before slipping on your socks and shoes.

Shoes and Socks

If you hit the trail often, invest in a pair of quality boots made just for hiking. Never take a long hike in brand new hiking shoes. Break your new shoes in over a period of shorter walks, alternating new shoes with the old comfy pair. Hiking boots should be replaced after 500 miles.

Wool socks will do the best job of keeping your feet dry, minimizing your risk of many issues including fungal infections and blisters. There are even lightweight options for warm weather. Toss an extra pair in your backpack in case your feet get sweaty and dampen your socks.

Blisters

Be sure to add some moleskin and some bandages to your first aid kit. Both are important in preventing and treating blisters. Be alert to hot spots, places where your shoes may be rubbing your feet and a blister may be forming. If you notice a particular spot of contact becoming uncomfortable, prevent a blister by applying a bandage. If you’re too late and a blister occurs, cover it with a bit of moleskin. Don’t pop your blister! It will heal on its own soon enough.

Snacks and Water

Every part of your body will benefit from hydration and nutrition on the trail. Make sure that you pack plenty of water for your day in the outdoors. Avoid caffeinated beverages and those containing sugar, both of which can ultimately contribute to dehydration. Snack-wise, stick to foods high in protein and natural sugars, which will contribute to stable blood sugar levels. Hard-boiled eggs and trail mix are both good options.

Coming Home

When you get home, change out of your hiking gear, wash and dry your feet once more, and put your feet up for a little while. You’ve earned it!

Are you having any kind of problem related to your feet, ankles, or lower legs? With decades of experience, Dr. Boris Abramov and Dr. Tatyana Abramova can help. They will carefully examine your feet to accurately diagnose the source of your discomfort, work with you to create a unique treatment plan using the most-up-to-date methods available, and provide thorough follow up to make sure you keep feeling great. Call Abramov’s Comprehensive Foot Care at 443-872-7052 or click here today to schedule an appointment in our comfortable and convenient Pikesville office.

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